Sticky Belonging: Hegemonic Gazes and the Taming of Queer Asian American Identities

Mary Muromcew, ’21 CAMD ScholarFaculty Advisor: MJ Wong Engel, Fellow in English What does it mean to belong as a queer Asian American in the United States? Whose terms is their belonging really on? To answer these questions, Mary Muromcew ‘22’s research employs a historical lens to explore how queer Asian Americans navigate belonging in theContinue reading “Sticky Belonging: Hegemonic Gazes and the Taming of Queer Asian American Identities”

Mind the Gap: Traversing the Imagination Gap, Emancipating Children’s Literature

Nana Afia Boadi-Acheampong, ’21 CAMD ScholarFaculty Advisor: Megan Paulson, Instructor in History In our imaginations, vast universes await. In our heads, we can invent, ponder, and visualize the many possibilities for our lives. Our imaginations are limitless… right? In her presentation, Nana Afia Boadi-Acheampong ‘21 will examine the ways in which fantastical children’s literature andContinue reading “Mind the Gap: Traversing the Imagination Gap, Emancipating Children’s Literature”

2019-2020 CAMD Scholars

Our ’19-’20 CAMD Scholars faced a unique set of circumstances towards the end of the school year. Despite the unexpected changes to their senior year, they were resilient and completed projects that focused on investigating equity, diversity, multiculturalism, and/or social justice. Click on the titles to learn more about each project and watch presentations!

The Medical Mystery: Racial Disparities in the American Healthcare System

Irene Kwon ’21 Faculty Advisor:  Clair Dahm, Instructor in History and Social ScienceOctober 30, 2020 Can healthcare be racist? Can science be biased? These questions arise in a contemporary setting in which health outcomes are drastically different depending on the color of one’s skin. Irene Kwon ’21 will address the impact of systemic racism inContinue reading “The Medical Mystery: Racial Disparities in the American Healthcare System”

The Effects of (Mis)Representation in Visual Media on Asian American Youth

Natalie Shen ’20 Faculty Advisor: Lilia Cai-Hurteau April 24, 2020 The perseverance of centuries-old racist notions in modern entertainment has led to the acceptance of lackluster, or wholly nonexistent, representations of the Asian/American experience in visual media. This is particularly concerning in relation to cartoons, an industry specifically targeting children. These characters are role modelsContinue reading “The Effects of (Mis)Representation in Visual Media on Asian American Youth”

Children of Refugees: Reclamation and the Courage to Tell Our Stories

Tenzin Sharlung ’20 Faculty Advisor: Lilia Cai-Hurteau December 13, 2019 What are the unique struggles of children of refugees in this country? In her research project entitled, “Children of Refugees: Reclamation and the Courage to Tell Our Stories,” Sharlung, ’20, centers stories from the Tibetan community in Boston as well as other young people onContinue reading “Children of Refugees: Reclamation and the Courage to Tell Our Stories”

Killing Us Softly: The Impact of Stereotypes, Stress, and Diet on Low-Income Black and Latinx Communities

Chioma Ugwonali ’20 Faculty Advisor: Marisela Ramos November 15, 2019 From years of driving through her great grandmother’s historically Black community in Texas and similar communities around the nation, CAMD Scholar Chioma Ugwonali ’20 has noticed a stark contrast in businesses and food availability. Chioma’s research paper, “Killing Us Softly: The Impact of Stereotypes, Stress, and Diet onContinue reading “Killing Us Softly: The Impact of Stereotypes, Stress, and Diet on Low-Income Black and Latinx Communities”

Disempowered in Black Power? Rethinking Black Women’s Contributions to Activists Movements

Aissata Bah ’20 Faculty Advisor: Dr. Bridget Tsemo MLK Day, January 20, 2020 A quick Google search of the Black Panther Party overwhelmingly yields images of Black men, either with their fists in the air or a gun to their hand. The narratives we currently tell about Black Power are lacking in number and quality,Continue reading “Disempowered in Black Power? Rethinking Black Women’s Contributions to Activists Movements”

The Digital Mirror: How Minority-Focused Casts are Revolutionizing Representation in Television

Jeffrey Steele ’20 Faculty Advisor: Rafael Kelman February 7, 2020 How do you see yourself in the mirror? Do you see that on screen? Currently there’s a trend of television shows focused on the experiences of a particular minority group, populated by casts of that identity. As more minorities enter the behind-the-scenes action of production,Continue reading “The Digital Mirror: How Minority-Focused Casts are Revolutionizing Representation in Television”